Everything You Wanted to Know about Laicity But Were Afraid to Ask

By: Rachel May The Quebec ban on religious symbols, enacted as “An Act respecting the laicity of the State” and commonly known as Bill 21, has always been controversial.  Canadians are both passionate and sensitive about the subject matter, an explosive combination.  Combine that with the apparent contradiction of certain rights and freedoms guaranteed by…

The Pandemic Spoke Loud and Clear – it is Time to Care About our Most Vulnerable

By: Anastasia Volkov There is little doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted all of our lives. However, several snapshots released by Statistics Canada in late August report a disproportionate impact on individuals with disabilities. Unfortunately, the disability community frequently does not receive the attention it deserves. Yet, nearly 25 per cent of Canadians over the…

Unveiling Bill C62

On October 17, the Liberal government of Quebec passed Bill 62, titled “an Act to foster adherence to State religious neutrality.” The bill received a staggering 66 votes in favour and 51 against. The bill mandates how employees of “public bodies” – that is, government employees – and those receiving public services should dress, specifically…

Down the Cylinder Part 2: The National Energy Board and pipeline regulation

Ian T.D. Thomson My last pipeline explainer left us on a policy cliff-hanger. Pipelines are crucial to Canada’s economy and energy infrastructure. As the primary mode of transportation for resources, they connect our exports to the United States. The history of pipelines in Canada dates back over 150 years, with some of the first pipeline…

Opinion: Bill 94, A By-Product of American Orientalist Discourse

Shane Senécal-Tremblay Advanced by former Quebec Premier Jean Charest in 2010, Bill 94 is a controversial piece of legislation that effectively revokes fundamental freedoms and rights from those women whose religious beliefs include the wearing of a niqab. More specifically, the bill prohibits face-covering women from giving or receiving government services in the name of…

The Right to Die: The Carter Case and Assisted Suicide in Canada

Alexis Mulvenna On October 14, the question of whether Canadians have the right to seek assisted suicide made its way to the Supreme Court of Canada yet again. Assisted suicide, which is currently illegal in Canada, is the intentional killing of oneself with the help of another. The issue was famously first addressed by the Supreme…