The road to Queen’s Park, and other election news – March 28, 2018

Good morning PPGR enthusiasts! Brace yourselves – it’s almost time for another provincial election in Ontario. The past few months have seen significant political turmoil with the resignation of Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown and rise of Doug Ford as the new PC leader going into the election. The articles below delve into other issues…

The Throne Speech is not a Campaign Event

By Sacha Forstner On March 15th, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne unexpectedly prorogued the legislature for four days. For those unfamiliar with parliamentary jargon, “prorogation” refers to the ending of a legislative session by the Crown (always on the advice of the Premier). Practically speaking, prorogation means that the Legislative Assembly is temporarily shut down and all…

Canada’s Policy Transformations – January 17 2018

Good morning PPGR enthusiasts! As we wind down the celebrations for Canada’s sesquicentennial, this week’s Morning Brief is a special edition, highlighting Canada’s Policy Transformations: The Last 50 and the Next, a major conference where both academics and policy influencers reflected on the country’s past in order to speculate about its future. This week’s Morning Brief was…

50 Years of Election Promises, Public Policy and Democracy in Canada

Sacha Forstner and Katerina Stamadianos How can we hold government officials accountable to the public who elected them? Whatever the method, we first need to determine what exactly we are holding them accountable for. To do so, we often compare a government’s policies and actions to the promises they made during their election. Typically, the…

How to become a Toronto City Councillor

On Thursday, November 2nd, Toronto’s City Council held a special meeting to appoint a new council member to Ward 28. The successful candidate, Lucy Troisi, filled the ward seat that had been vacant since long-time Councillor Pam McConnell passed away in July. Appointments tend to happen if one of Council’s 45 seats (44 ward representatives…

Why and how Canada should lower the voting age to 16

Federico Vargas Why and how Canada should lower the voting age to 16 Few today would question the right of 18-year-olds to vote in elections. Until as recently as 1971 however, Canadians younger than 21 years of age were barred from casting a ballot for federal elections. A survey conducted in 1958 also found that…