New Year, New Agenda: What to Expect in 2015

Deanna Veltri As the new year begins, policy-makers across Canada are gearing up for what looks be a busy year ahead. 2015 is expected to bring a packed political agenda with issues of both national and regional scope that will make for an interesting lead-up to the federal election scheduled for October 19 (although many…

Where Are We Going? Public Transit and Racial Equity in Toronto

Scarlett Jones Overt institutional racism may no longer be socially acceptable in Canada, as it was during the days of the Chinese head tax, yet it has certainly proven to be persistent. Racial inequities continue to exist along institutional fault lines. For example, there is a disproportionate correlation between race and poverty, with visible minorities…

Fighting “Barbaric Cultural Practices” as Public Policy

Saad Omar Khan Sometime in his tenure as Britain’s Commander-in-Chief in India during a period of British rule in the nineteenth century, General Sir Charles Napier was approached by several Hindu priests regarding his aggressive crackdown on the practice of sati—the ritual burning of widows upon the death of their husbands. The priests’ objection to the colonial…

National Pharmacare: Canada’s Prescription for Change

Brynne Moore As Canadians, we take pride in our national health care system; and at its core, that system is about providing universal and equal access to medical and hospital care. The Canada Health Act (CHA) mandates that equitable health care be provided on the fundamental basis of medical necessity. While the specifics of what is…

Volume 6, Issue 1 (Winter 2014)

The latest edition of the Public Policy and Governance Review is out now and available online for your reading pleasure. Volume 6, Issue 1 of the Public Policy and Governance Review comes at an exciting time in the Canadian policy world. Recently contested electoral mandates in Ontario, technological advancements, and an upcoming federal election are…

Baptists, Bootleggers, and the Regulatory Cocktail

Zachary Lewsen In the early 1930s, after the prohibition on alcohol in America was formally repealed, Baptists and other religious leaders across the country lobbied for the Sunday Closing Laws. Often referred to as the “Blue Laws”, these regulations prohibited alcohol sales on Sundays. Yet in advocating for this restriction, the religious community was undoubtedly unaware of…